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20121001
20121031
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KQEH (PBS) 17
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
it was a lack of understanding of the importance of the latino community. i think they don't understand how fast we're growing, how influential we have become and how politicians are now forced to respond to the issues that affect latinos. i think that they over saw that. i don't think they really paid attention. >> sometimes we are invisible and we are fighting so hard not to be invisible. the commission of presidential debates are stuck in the 1950s. they still think the country could be divided between men and women and that's it. they do not realize that one in every three persons in the united states is from a minority. they think it is okay it have an african-american president but they don't think it's okay to have an african-american or hispanic journalist as a moderator for the debates. what we did, it was our wonderful response to this oversight, this huge oversight. instead they didn't want to invite us to the party so we had our own party. >> and that party turned out pretty good. >> so, yeah, maybe. >> you mean the presidential forums you're having? >> yes. >> which came after you w
by the presidential campaigns for a key voting bloc. >> suarez: although latinos make up the country's largesta minority, about 9% of the u.s. electorate, in a tight election, these voters could end up providing the winner with the margin of victory. >> brown: judy woodruff gets an inside view of the financial crisis and the government ba out from former fdic head sheila bair. >> warner: and markhields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.hi >> major funding for the c2 newour has been provided by:c2 ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ooing support of these institutions and foundat.nsoi and... friends of the newshou >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contributions to your p station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: lebanon found itself reliving a nightmarish past today after the worst bombing in fr years. at least eit people were killed and nearly 80 wounded in a car-bomb attack.le
's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit from-- blark white, latino, asian. everybody benefits from these cross-racial interactions. and too many of our high schools are racially identified. there's lot of residential segregation leading to segregation in school, not by law but by practice. the result is too many kids don't have these interactionsess until they get to college and are able to learn from each other and break down stereotypes. the ramification of this case could be far reaching depending on how the court rules. >> richard kahlenberg, far-reaching? >> absolutely. this goes to what we mean by equal opportunity in our society. should race count in deciding who gets ahead? how do we create racial diversity in our universities? i agree with debo that it's very important that our leading institutions of higher education have students of all different racial and ethnic groups. my concern with the current affirmative action is that essentially, universities assemble wealthy kids of all colors, and we're not getting that genuine diversity that has to do also with
, courting north carolina and its african american voters-- and, through advertising, its latino voters, too; an update on the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in libya; why is the great barrier reef disappearing?; and the macarthur geniuses. but first, with the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: j.p. morgan chase now faces a major mortgage fraud lawsuit involving the actions of bear stearns, the former rival it bought in 2008. new york state filed the civil case monday. it alleges bear stearns misled investors who bought securities based on sub-prime mortgage loans in 2006 and 2007. their collapse led to huge losses. new york state attorney general eric schneiderman said today on cnbc the company's actions were flagrant. >> you can't as a prosecutor allow this conduct conduct to go unpunished and send a message that there's one set of rules for one group of people and another set for others. we brought the case because it was ready. it's the first case ready. we are by no means singling them out. >> holman: the lawsuit is the first to arise out of a federal- state wor
to build teams of like-mindalled volunteers, latinos for obama,w pacific islanders for obama. sportsmen for obama. all being recruited as part of the obama ground game. they meet online and then gather in the real world. >> i think we're expecting a few more people who are going to get started so we can keep on with our agenda. >> sreenivasan: this group of volunteers who cared about lesbian, gay, by sexual and transgender issues was preparing to go out and canvass local voters in support of the president. it seems whether it's dashboard or the mobile apps, they serve two purposes: one, to make sure your teams are in communication with one another and another to learn about the voters you're going out and reaching. >> absolutely. we're always going to be collecting information. because that's how, you know, we extend our reach. that's how we can continue to communicate with that person. just one phice call or one ema is not going to get that person to be... to the polls on election day. >> sreenivasan: for years campaigns have dreed of being d able to take the informationi they gather t
an saw something completely different than most people than african- americans, latinos and women saw it. so i don't think you see a lot of people thinking, for example, that barack obama deappreciatated the presidency, they were happy, they saw him as a leader, and they felt that he was finally showing leadership skills during that last debate performance. so it is interesting to see that mitt romney's numbers are ticking up. but if you look at favorability ratings, his numbers are still not good. >> mort. >> i thlok the debates e have been the passaic river ole moments in this -- the pivot ol issues in this campaign. more importantly from mitt romney's point of view, he came across as being presidential. he came across as being knowledgeable, he came across as being articulate, logical, so i think he transformed his image to a lot of people. >> mitt romney? >> yeah, mitt romn. >> i thought he came . across a being incredibly rude and disrespectful of the presidency. debate. first >> yeah, that's just the first debate. in the second debate, if i may say, so t if ere's one person who rea
. there was a swiss girl. there was an indian guy, vinay. it was he and a couple of others. >> my roommate was latino. i mean, it was awesome. it was a cultural soup that really tasted good for everyone, you know, and he was in thei center oit. >> narrator: eventually, he took an important step. >> i asked, you know."barry obama. what kind of name is that for a brother? you know, where are you from exactly?" and he said, "well, i'm from hawaii, but my father was kenyan. and his name was barack obama. and i go by barry so that i don't have to explain my name all the time, and go into a long explanation of myself." and so i said, "well, if your name is barack obama, i'm going to call you barack obama because i like that name. >> narrator: in the school's literary magazine, barry now identified himself as barack obama. >> i think the word "barack" is absolutely essential to that identity of being, "i am a man. i am a man with a future. i need to be prepared for whatever that is going to be. i don't know the answers yet. but i sure as heck know i won't get there if i hang out and take things for granted
and the-- see, the president has a number of discreet constituents-- latinos, working women, college-educated women-- to whom he has spoken. the thing. a national debate, you're speaking to everybody at the same time. there's no demographic cliques or subgroups. it's everybody. that's consider i think debates are so important. >> woodruff: we're popping the popcorn. we're on the edge of our seats. we'll see both of you in three hours. we will be back at 9:00 p.m. eastern for special coverage of this debate but our effort effoe ongoing online. we will have a live scream where you can watch the debate and live analysis from our team. we're send our "newshour" hat-cam to a debate watch party here in washington. following the debate, "newshour" political editor christina belland tony will be talking to undecide voters at a google-plus hang out >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": rough flying for american airlines; the pope's butler on trial in rome; chasing the early voters in iowa; a medical breakthrough for critically ill infants and jim lehrer on past debates. but first, with t
and professor of latin american and latino studies at the university of illinois in chicago. her books include "by heart/de memoria: cuban women's journeys in and out of exile" and "the lost apple: operation pedro pan, cuban children in the u.s., and the promise of a better future." professor, cuba has been a particularly tough place for its citizens to travel from, for some time. if you stay out of the country for more than 11 months you lose your right to residency. you lose your health care. is this a big change? >> i think it's a very significant change to the extent that this law, which was actually called the law of definitive abandonment, a very brave world, if you will, kind of description here. and the law prevented cubans from returning. initially it was actually 60 days. the 11 months comes much later. but in 1961 if you left for whatever reason and did not return within 60 days, you lost your home, your property, and your right to be returned to your family. so many families really have been divided by this law. now having said this, i think we need to really look at the overall co
"alienated the sts est-growing demographic group in theow country, the latino community." he predicted the g.o.p. will join him in finally passing major migration reform.jo for his part, romney fired back in reno, nevada. he said the president's been reduced to misplaced attacks on his record. >> with four...our debates behind us, including the vice presidential debate, the president's been unable to find an... an agenda and to communicate an agenda and to defend an agenda.ba and that's one reason why i think we all know that he's out of ideas and out of excuses. and in november, you're going to put him out of office. >> reporter: for both sides, the stepped-up pace was a sign of just how tight the race is, in the closing stage of the campaign. over the next 13 daysboth candidates will barnstorm a series of swing states where the white house will be won or lost. perhaps none more important than ohio, where the vice presidential candidates were campaigning. >> well, folks, you probably heard the rumor that ohio is going to pick the next president of the united states of america. and i'm happy
it is sort ofre counterintuitive. ohio has one sixth percentage of latinos or hispanic voters than the country does at large. i mean it doesn't have the minorities that you associate with sort of democratic growth or democratic coalition. and i really do think david's right, steve ratner did a great job but it was barack obama. and mitt romney was wrong. d this, they're still on the defensive about this, at redntly as thursday night in defines, ohio, rob portman, senator fromas ohio and the surrogate debate substitute for president obama introduced mitt romney saying let's get this straight. mitt romney was the first guy-- barack obama took gm and chrysler through bankruptcy. mitt romney was for guaranteeing loans, and they're still trying to explain it. and he's very much on the fensive. so obama is runningve better with whnies and white males in ohio than he is elsewhere, in large part because of the auto bailout and they've got a great ground game in ohio too. >> we should emphasize it's not a slam-dunk for obama. if you look at the polls it's been a very steady two point advant
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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